ShenaniTims Vs. Anki: Round 57

So I think I’ve hit critical mass with my new vocabulary. Still have quite the backlog of words to learn, and I continue to add (40-50) a week with my Korean classes at work. I’ve noticed my quizzes are getting bigger almost daily; usually averaging around ~170 words per day now, up from ~150 a few weeks ago. Which can only mean one thing:

A major culling is on the horizon.

With these many words hitting me daily, it’s a clear sign that some of these words just aren’t clicking. I’m not getting them, and (for some) I have no real motivation to try to learn them. I mean, I guess “hope” is a useful noun to know, but how often do you use “hope” in a sentence? And, if you didn’t know the word “hope,” would you be able to formulate a similar sentence working around it?

Further evidence of this is how often some of the new words (or not so new anymore words) are dropping out of the rotation. Each day one or two words will drop to Leech status. Not amazing in its own right (I add so many and have so many at this point that losing some is a given), but these aren’t words that have been around the block. These are words that were added within the last two months and never made a connection.

anki-stats-2017-08-08@00-58-21

As for class, it was one BIG step backwards. With the hope that by resetting my pronunciation errors I’ll be able to step forward a bit more ably in the future.

(Arrgh! Did I just use “hope” in a sentence! I’m not even through a tiny blog and already I’m proving myself wrong!)


So this week’s class was based on me learning to recognize the sounds of 아, 오, 어, and 우. Korean doesn’t have a singular “A” sound. “A” is split into two: hard A (아) and soft A (어). While it’s not hard to tell those two apart, it is difficult to hear the difference between 어 and 오; because they both sound like “oh.” 오’s “O” is more similar to “over,” while 어 sounds like the “o” in “ought.”

Which again, might not seem that hard when you’re sitting at home saying “over” and “ought” repeatedly, but once you start putting them into words, and their sounds start mixing with other sounds, the little differences you hear disappear.

So all week I’ve been practicing chanting 아, 야, 어, 여, 오, 요, 우, 유 when riding my bike. You can see on the first photo the 10 question quiz I took in class Sunday. I got a perfect, my teacher would say a sound and I had to transcribe it. Often asking him to repeat the sound and then watching the shape his mouth made. (You can see my (bad) attempts at drawing the mouth shapes in Picture #2. But I scored a 100, so it can be done. It will just take a lot of practice.

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